Political change – Jury Team http://juryteam.org/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://juryteam.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-10-120x120.png Political change – Jury Team http://juryteam.org/ 32 32 Can protest affect political change? https://juryteam.org/can-protest-affect-political-change/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://juryteam.org/can-protest-affect-political-change/ A woman holds up a sign at a pro-choice rally. In this article, Nell and Harrison discuss whether or not the protest affects political change. Photo courtesy of Derek French at Pexels.com N1: Let me put on my classic 18th century liberal hat just once. Demonstration is one of the most critical tools members of […]]]>

A woman holds up a sign at a pro-choice rally. In this article, Nell and Harrison discuss whether or not the protest affects political change. Photo courtesy of Derek French at Pexels.com

N1: Let me put on my classic 18th century liberal hat just once.

Demonstration is one of the most critical tools members of a political movement should have in their arsenal. There’s a reason people have fought tooth and nail, even given their lives for the right to protest in public – because protesting alone is enough to trigger the sweeping changes we need to transform society into a just society. and egalitarian.

Even in the simplistic model of students, community members, or other disgruntled participants in society marching through the streets with signs and chants, protest is a perfect analogue of democracy. Mob politics is shaped by compromise and shared experience, producing a coherent goal that is no more messy than the agendas set by often disorganized and deadlocked governments. It is a form of experiential learning to lead or participate in a protest, the most important lesson being how to organize yourself and others in a political movement and jump ahead.

More importantly, you cannot change the situation without establishing the intention. What good is a declaration of intent made in a dark underground complex, isolated from your relatives in society? A key function of the protest is to publicly reject the mandate of those in power and force them to face the public opposition their actions have fomented.

H1: Demonstration is an ineffective means of influencing political change. We spend hours and hours creating signs and banners, gathering attendees, listing speakers and topics, and honing our public speaking skills. These strategies are ineffective because they can be ignored. At the University of Connecticut, through movements for mental health to protect students from death, movements to protect black lives from racism, movements for accountability for sexual violence, movements to fight against anti-Semitism, historic protests for climate justice, movements against the university’s relationship with settler states and the military-industrial complex, the administration has consistently, consistently, and effectively ignored every protest organized by students. Worse than ignorance, when protests become large or consistent, a resourceless, powerless, and unaccountable “task force” is established whose main objective is to further thwart political organizing among protesters by extracting resources student-organizers and convincing the student body that their initial effort had enough impact to catalyze change.

After years of demonstration, all of the above issues are pending at UConn. Why pursue the same strategy over and over again, hoping for a different outcome? If we want data on the effectiveness of demonstration, how far should we look beyond our own home?

N2: The arguments against demonstration are understandable, but many of them are based on assumptions about human behavior that are not grounded in reality. For example, the idea that protests can be easily co-opted by those you are protesting against betrays a fundamental undervaluation of people’s intelligence and agency. Doubtful speech, a risky turn on a dead-end street riddled with cops can fool newcomers, but experienced political organizers or protesters can democratically negotiate the terms and direction of the rally, as is often required because organizers are also imperfect. Another common criticism of demonstration is that it, in and of itself, does not affect change, to which I refute: Change for whom? Ask the young revolutionary, whose dreams of societal transformation are still buried under a life under the status quo, who is then transformed by the solidarity and electricity flowing through a protest. Ask the organization that is getting stronger because like-minded activists met at a successful protest. The potential is unlimited!

H2: Protest actually has adverse effects as a strategy to pursue political change. By protesting, people think they are contributing to a movement, attending it once and believing they are fulfilling an ethical obligation in the face of injustice. These people neglect to investigate the real work necessary for justice because they believe that a protest effectively pursues this goal, which is completely false. A culture has been created so that, while participation is seen as important, it is entirely acceptable and ultimately encouraged to attend certain protests without committing to the issues they address or the groups that organize themselves around problems. Although no commitments are made by anyone other than a small group of overworked students, injustices remain and politics stagnates.

Throughout, the university can create public relations communications affirming that it receives and interfaces with student grievances, responding to their concerns in a timely manner while continuing to overlook or sponsor violence that frustrates students . According to the institutional structure, universities give priority to rankings and income, which demonstrations generally do not have an impact. These structural concerns, not emotional beliefs or ignorance of the issue, are the reason the university remains committed to violence. How will your demonstration address this reality?

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Want to see political change? Look at the margins | Rebecca Solnit https://juryteam.org/want-to-see-political-change-look-at-the-margins-rebecca-solnit/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 20:01:00 +0000 https://juryteam.org/want-to-see-political-change-look-at-the-margins-rebecca-solnit/ JThese days, I think of myself as a turtle at the ephemera party. By that I mean I try to see the long trajectory of change behind current events, because it takes time to see change, and understanding change is key to understanding politics and culture, let alone trying to participate in it. The short-term […]]]>

JThese days, I think of myself as a turtle at the ephemera party. By that I mean I try to see the long trajectory of change behind current events, because it takes time to see change, and understanding change is key to understanding politics and culture, let alone trying to participate in it. The short-term vision generates incomprehension and inefficiency.

Events, like living beings, have genealogies and evolutions, and knowing them means knowing who they are, how they got there, to whom and to what they are connected. If you follow them in real time or in the historical archives, you can often see power emerging from below and ideas moving from the margins to the center. You can see how it all works. And yet these trajectories and genealogies are often overlooked in news, conversation, and seemingly the conception of how something happened.

Change itself becomes invisible when your timeline is shorter than that change, and short-sightedness breeds defeatism and despair. Not so long ago, people would tell me that feminism had failed, seemingly unable to recognize the extraordinary changes in the legal and cultural status of women over the past half-century, or assuming that the dismantling of millennia of patriarchy was a simple task that should be fully completed in a few decades. We have just started.

Oblivion is everywhere. Take the Biden administration’s announcement in August of a sweeping student loan relief package. If you didn’t follow the story, you might believe it was a gift from above rather than a long-fought achievement from below. If you followed it, you’ll remember how student debt emerged as a priority during the Occupy Wall Street uprising in 2011. Raising the voices of those crushed by debt and decrying the system who crushed them, he changed the national conversation.

Nonetheless, from the start of Occupy, pundits said it was a failure, and when the Zuccotti Park presence in Lower Manhattan was violently dispersed by police in November 2011, they declared it over. But even when the rock is at the bottom of the pool, the ripples continue to propagate.

Occupy’s impact had just begun. It inspired other occupations far beyond New York, including some outside the United States. Across the country, police accountability groups, foreclosure victim and homeless solidarity organizations, and many other progressive projects have sprung up. Some of them lasted.

One of them was the Debt Collective, founded in 2012. It successfully took on all forms of debt – housing, health and education – and began organizing to directly abolish debt, campaign for the debt abolition and legal changes, and drawing public attention to the devastating cruelty of the system.

In 2015, the Debt Collective announced that a student debt strike it had organized had launched “an ongoing campaign that has helped secure federal law changes and more than $2 billion in abolition of student debt to date”. Activists made student debt a public issue and then part of the Biden campaign platform, which ultimately led to debt relief measures last month.

The year Collectif Dette launched its campaign, the Supreme Court recognized marriage equality as a constitutional right. The short-lived version would have seen this right as also being pronounced from above by the United States Supreme Court, rather than being constructed from below. But the court only gave legal force to long-term campaigns that encouraged and built on broader changes in the acceptance and support of gay rights and inclusion. To see these changes, you also need to remember what things looked like before.

Early in the history of this country, John Adams wrote to Thomas Jefferson that the war of independence from the British throne was not revolution; “revolution was in the minds of the people and it was done from 1760 to 1775…before a drop of blood was shed in Lexington.” It is an affirmation that crucial change has come through culture, through beliefs and values, that the most important territory to take is in the imagination.

Once you create a new idea of ​​what is possible and acceptable, the seeds are planted; once it becomes what the majority believes, you have created the conditions in which victory occurs. This is perhaps the least tangible, but most important, part of a campaign. Ideas are powerful and dangerous, as their enemies know, and everyone often forgets.

One of the joys of being a turtle is watching the slow journey of ideas from the margins to the center, seeing what was invisible, then deemed impossible, become widely accepted. The other day, editors of the Salt Lake City Tribune called for draining Lake Powell, the now-failing reservoir created 60 years ago by Glen Canyon Dam, to turn its beautiful canyons into a new park. national. It was considered an outrageous idea 20 years ago. The City of Oakland has just announced its intention to return five acres of open space to its original Ohlone owners, a small but enormous act in recognition of Native American land rights. Barack Obama himself tweeted in favor of student debt relief which he did not support as president.

If people are myopic about the past, they are also myopic about the future – many complaints about the incompleteness of reforming and canceling student loans have been met with the wish of the Debt Collective that they were far from over.

One of the things that disappears in the short term is the fact that almost all changes are gradual and that even an overall victory usually has intermediate stages preceding it. As imperfect and frustrating as these steps are, they can still lead us to our destination. We cannot reach the top without climbing the mountain.

Perhaps some of this is embedded in the information system, which tends to report events as sudden breakdowns rather than the consequence of long-term forces. It may stem more from the attachment to the idea of ​​revolution, to anything that changes overnight, although it is no longer reasonable, if ever it was, to believe that regime change can change everything – and the long revolutions around gender, nature, race and the rest in our time have been progressive and largely cultural means, even if they produce concrete ends by changing laws, policies and finance.

Perhaps the problem is rooted in the very word news, as in new. In the sense that everything has a story, nothing is entirely new. (Even mayflies can live for a year or two as underwater larvae before emerging into the air for their few days of winged life.) I have witnessed and sometimes participated in the change and seen so much versions of people failing to see change, believing change is impossible, walking away prematurely, dismissing those who try because of this lack of perspective.

As far as I know, the ephemeral vision is of a perpetual present in which the order of things is largely unchanging. Martin Luther King Jr memorably said, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.

You can discuss how it folds – we’ve definitely seen it fold other ways lately – and how to fold it. But you have to stick around for that long sight to see it bend. Kept them worse. Fortunately, they are not the only ones with tenacity.

Examples are everywhere. In 2020, after 31 years of organizing, the coalition of ranchers, Nevada natives, and other rural people who came together as the Great Basin Water Network finally defeated Las Vegas’ attempt to extract the water from one of the driest places on the continent. The plan would have taken 58 billion gallons of water a year from eastern Nevada, devastating wildlife and rural communities. As Eric Siegel’s report in High Country News summarized, “The Vegas Pipeline, if successful, threatened to create a dust bowl of 305 springs, 112 miles of streams, 8,000 acres of wetlands and 191,000 acres of scrub habitat, almost all on public land.

Siegel quoted Ely Shoshone Tribal elder Delaine Spilsbury as saying, “Never abandon ship. Never. That’s the kind of feeling I think most of us had. Let’s do our best and make something happen, even if it takes forever.

It didn’t take forever but it took decades. For much of that time, it would have been easy to watch the fight and conclude that it was doomed or a loser because it didn’t win. The same could be said of many other campaigns, including the student movement to get Harvard University to divest from fossil fuels, which took 10 years to achieve victory in 2021. Like my friend Astra Taylor from the Debt Collective pointed it out to me when I complimented her, “We’re all losers until we win.”

Another friend of mine, Joe Lamb, is a poet and arborist who sports a T-shirt that says, “70 is young for a tree.” In a recent essay on the epic tree-planting program that was part of the New Deal effort to stop the erosion that produced the Dust Bowl, he wrote, “We must remember that we can learn and repeat the successes of our past. “It was a wonderful revision of the old ‘those who forget history are doomed to repeat it’.

There are past victories that you want to repeat, or build on, or learn from. This is why understanding how they unfold is so essential, recognizing that an oak tree was once an acorn then a spindly sapling, remembering this law was once a radical idea then a campaign. It means seeing the world as a turtle, not as a fleeting one.

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Center mobilizes for political change in Punjab: Khawaja Asif https://juryteam.org/center-mobilizes-for-political-change-in-punjab-khawaja-asif/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 01:05:13 +0000 https://juryteam.org/center-mobilizes-for-political-change-in-punjab-khawaja-asif/ Lahore – Defense Minister Khawaja Asif said a change of government in Punjab would bring political stability given the current situation and also confirmed reports that the federal government would show flexibility for political change in the province. Speaking in an interview on a private television channel, he said: “Yes, we still have the option […]]]>

Lahore – Defense Minister Khawaja Asif said a change of government in Punjab would bring political stability given the current situation and also confirmed reports that the federal government would show flexibility for political change in the province.

Speaking in an interview on a private television channel, he said: “Yes, we still have the option of [change of] government of Punjab and we will act when we deem it feasible. When asked if the change would upset the existing uncertainty in the country, he replied, “We are working on it politically and the change will bring political stability to this uncertainty.”

Speaking about the appointment of the new army chief expected in November this year, the defense minister said that it was Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif’s prerogative and that the government’s allies would be given confidence.

He added that consultations would be made with the institution and that it would forward the names of the officers recommended for the new chief. “So far, no consultation has been launched on it,” Asif noted.

He also said he was not in favor of a “minus one formula” in politics. PTI President Imran Khan had recently tweeted and criticized the government for “adopting the minus one formula” to remove him from the political arena. Asif said it was not the job of government or politicians to adopt such tactics, adding that he personally would not advise it. He also acknowledged that the PML-N had been struggling politically in recent months, adding however that the party would “come back successfully”.

Asif also said that the return of party leader Nawaz Sharif was not yet planned, but he would return. “His return will give a big boost to the political situation in the country,” he added.

Speaking about MP Ali Wazir’s situation, the Defense Minister said his and other issues, such as those of missing persons, need to be addressed and called for national consensus on them.

“But I would say that Wazir’s case should be considered for humanitarian reasons,” he added.

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Vaccination mandates drive political change https://juryteam.org/vaccination-mandates-drive-political-change/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 11:42:56 +0000 https://juryteam.org/vaccination-mandates-drive-political-change/ A devout Christian, father and African American, Michael Anderson did not feel represented by any party and until January 31 of this year he remained without political affiliation. But a series of events led him to align and campaign alongside conservatives in one of North Carolina’s most liberal counties. Anderson is an attorney for a […]]]>

A devout Christian, father and African American, Michael Anderson did not feel represented by any party and until January 31 of this year he remained without political affiliation. But a series of events led him to align and campaign alongside conservatives in one of North Carolina’s most liberal counties.

Anderson is an attorney for a Big Tech company in Charlotte. Based a few miles from the border in South Carolina, his company claims the fifth-largest internet footprint in the United States. Superiors have a stated goal of widespread “influence”. They succeed on this objective.

On November 18, 2021, the CEO appeared before an all-employee meeting at the Charlotte site and said for the “greater good of humanity” that it was no longer enough to separate workers who did not had not received a Covid-19 vaccine. They had to be removed entirely.

The entire company had been working remotely for nearly two years by then, Anderson said. The announcement fell just before the holidays.

“Hundreds of people found out that day that they would be fired unless they submitted to the warrant without an approved medical or religious exemption,” Anderson said.

Anderson reached out to her colleagues via an internal Slack channel to share her concerns and received a flood of responses expressing stress and fear.

“I worked in tough places with tough people and it was the toughest week of my career,” Anderson said. “I grew up in a single parent family below the poverty line. Single mothers [were contacting me]. Pregnant women contacted me to find out if they could benefit from medical dispensation. There were so many inequities and unfair consequences to this poorly thought out and draconian mandate.

About sixty employees joined. “All these people [losing their jobs] are high achievers and hardworking people, some who have been with the company for 15 to 16 years,” Anderson said. “I asked the CEO to change the policy, the director of diversity, the General Counsel; I couldn’t make them change their minds.

Anderson began using his legal expertise to help exemption seekers. Alongside like-minded freedom fighters, he developed a coalition, ByManyOrByFew, to inform, educate and connect voters.

“I thought we had to do something to fight these policies and channel people into freedom-minded politicians,” he said.

But Anderson didn’t stop there. A few weeks after the company’s announcement, he decided to run for a seat at North Carolina House in Mecklenburg, one of the most Democratic counties in the state. Choosing a party affiliation was now a matter of course.

In preparation to testify before the South Carolina House and Ways subcommittee on December 7, 2021, for a workplace vaccination bill that could potentially impact the North Carolina branch of the company for which he works, Anderson contacted both political parties. Not a single Democrat would respond, but many Republicans fighting for individual rights did. “Forty-four Caucasians were fighting to protect my rights,” he said.

Vaccines have historically had a disparate impact on minorities. Anderson cites the Tuskegee experiment as a horrific example. He saw history repeat itself with the Covid-19 vaccine, led by a Democratic president.

“When you brought out those vaccine mandates, I put the blame on President Biden’s feet,” Anderson said. “Although its mandates ultimately failed, many companies were encouraged and allowed to have their own vaccine mandates and a private company has much more flexibility than the government. As a result, in their words, it has caused systemic and institutional racism because it has a disparate impact on minorities.

This is who Anderson specifically wants to defend; and that Democrats continually fail to support or outright hurt with disastrous policies. Even with the CDC’s recently updated vaccine guidelines, Democratic leaders like Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser are pursuing policies that disproportionately harm minorities, like a vaccine mandate that would prevent 40% of DC’s black teens to learn in person.

“My district is 60 percent African American, 20 percent Latino,” Anderson said. “The reason I love this and this is where I want to be is not just because I’m African American, there’s no faster demographic shift from Democrat to Republican than from And if you look at vaccine mandates, no race has been more affected than African Americans.

Minority voters have been hurt by other far left policies and are expressing their displeasure at the polls. A recent NPR interview with political scientist Ruy Teixeira revealed how Democrats are pushing minority voters to subvert partisanship, especially among the Latino population.

“…[T]The ultra-progressive wing of the Democratic Party favoring criminal justice reform over public safety,” has become a top concern for minority voters, Teixeira said. “People want to be safe from crime, and that includes a lot of non-white voters. It is not for them to choose between the two, but above all it is necessary to ensure the safety of our community.

Anderson’s opponent for NC House District 99, Democratic Rep. Nasif Majeed, supported “ultra-progressive” defunding of Charlotte police during his previous campaign. Charlotte has only 1,600 police officers left for a city of 1 million people. Three hundred defections or retirements are expected in the short term and salaries start as low as $40,000. A lack of manpower has resulted in unanswered 911 calls and crimes under a felony that go entirely unanswered. “Social justice warriors” are crippling the police response, according to local law enforcement.

Democrats’ left-wing ideologies are bankrupting cities, and Anderson wants to get his city back on track, but he knows reform isn’t possible alongside the current Democrats in the North Carolina House, who hold a majority in the House. Legislative Assembly.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, Anderson grew up below the poverty line in a biracial single-parent home. Progressive policies imposed during the pandemic are driving inequalities that trap and eliminate those whom the far left claims to champion, he said. He feels there is no place for him in the Democratic Party right now.

Through a door-to-door campaign, he found that many registered Democrats in Charlotte agreed.

“I ask people what problems they have to represent and how the system is failing them,” Anderson said. “You have to have conversations with people to know.”

Authorized by a Democratic president, Democrat House and a coalition of Democratic governors, the tyranny of Covid-19 has pushed a new kind of minority leader like Anderson to represent an increasingly diverse Republican party – one that engages in the political battle and struggles for the moment tenuous freedoms once taken for granted.


Ashley Bateman is a policy writer for the Heartland Institute and blogger for Ascension Press. His work has been featured in The Washington Times, The Daily Caller, The New York Post, The American Thinker and many other publications. Previously, she worked as an adjunct researcher for the Lexington Institute and as an editor, writer, and photographer for The Warner Weekly, a publication for the American military community in Bamberg, Germany. Ashley is a board member of a Catholic home schooling cooperative in Virginia. She is homeschooling her four amazing children with her brilliant engineer/scientist husband who lives in Virginia.

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Whiting’s Chronicle: Leadership is the Key to Political Change https://juryteam.org/whitings-chronicle-leadership-is-the-key-to-political-change/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://juryteam.org/whitings-chronicle-leadership-is-the-key-to-political-change/ A rare commodity is not only valuable, but offers an opportunity to the charlatan, the impostor. This is especially true of leadership. The most important achievements of the group result from its presence. His absence has resulted in a non-functional partisan environment in Congress, in most states, and around the world. Leaders must choose between […]]]>

A rare commodity is not only valuable, but offers an opportunity to the charlatan, the impostor.

This is especially true of leadership. The most important achievements of the group result from its presence. His absence has resulted in a non-functional partisan environment in Congress, in most states, and around the world.



Leaders must choose between yesterday and tomorrow. The poor take the safe route and maintain the status quo. In today’s political environment, the safe path is to adopt one of two extreme positions and political parties, because either extreme position is known, comfortable and acceptable to a group of people who is heard. Staying there does not imply the risk of a change that could mean a better future for all.

Leadership is always sought after, often assumed, rarely present. In its absence, we desperately seek anything that claims to be, looks like it, says it is. We can be so hungry for it that we allow ourselves to be deceived.



A man was lost for three weeks in interior Alaska when his snow machine broke down. When he was found he was 25 miles from the snowmobile eating moose dung. When asked why he had walked so far, he replied, “I had three days’ worth of food. After a week I was starving but saw the golden arches of McDonalds in the distance. I wanted these burgers. The mirage he saw wasn’t there, but his mind wanted it so badly that he not only saw it, but when he got there he was so hungry he couldn’t tell the difference.

Gangs exist because those who feel lost, lack success or recognition in their lives find an association, a leader with whom they can identify. It is inherent in our nature.

Governing by contradictory positions and actions is not effective. Dictatorial action can get things done, but it is rarely acceptable to reasonable people or effective in the long run.

The extremes identify the parameters within which common sense remains, but leadership can provide the areas of common sense between the extremes that we can adapt and support to make solutions appropriate, practical, and achievable.

Effective leaders not only know their own mind, but approach challenges from a position of empathy and need to know opposing opinions. An understanding of the opposition is required, as well as a motivation to meet the needs of the majority in the middle, which expands for the good of the whole. Such hard work and submission is difficult.

If change is desired, one cannot come to an emotionally charged discussion with a list of demands, viewing everyone as an enemy. Selfish, political or partisan needs must be subordinated to human needs and practical implementation. It’s the only way democracy can work and survive when there are only two parties.

Remember that if a party has the President, the House and the Senate, the effective result is dictatorship.

In the Declaration of Independence, the Founding Fathers merged their views to recognize our unifying humanity. “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable rights to life, to liberty, to the pursuit of happiness.” To resolve differences, leaders must think like a spouse; the other becomes the priority requiring actions, not words, to that end if effective solutions are to result.

We are on the verge of losing our national identity. It’s already arrived. Lincoln fought the Civil War to protect the unity of our nation by freeing it from the shame of slavery. “With malice to no one, charity to all, firmness in right as God gives us to see right, let us strive to do all that can bring about and cherish a just and lasting peace not only among all nations, but beginning by ourselves.”

Lincoln had a cabinet of rivals, chosen not to repay political debt but because they were experts in their field. Lincoln listened to their differing views and led them to develop solutions for the good of the nation.

Compromise is not a weakness when it affects the public interest. It requires strength, maturity, illustrating the ability to bend. General denial is not an effective strategy. People have different opinions and situations. Therefore, general denial is not an effective strategy without the use of dictatorial methods.

Companies have learned that different heterogeneous points of view lead to the improvement of products and procedures. Inclusiveness of thoughts means understanding and not rejecting, modifying and not giving in.

The memorable leaders in our lives, whether teachers, coaches, pastors, parents, employers, didn’t need notes when they spoke to you. They didn’t need anyone telling them what to say, watching polls, or taking action to appease their egos. They were mostly worried about us. Their goal was to help us.

Democracy cannot be an internal war between parties, but rather a web of give and take.

If a democracy “of the people, by the people, for the people” is to endure, it requires leaders to have the maturity and passion to work for the good of the average person instead of their ego or their party. It is our personal responsibility to demand political leaders who demonstrate these characteristics.

Bryan Whiting believes that most of our problems are best solved by personal responsibility and an understanding of nonpartisan economics rather than government intervention. Comments and column suggestions to: bwpersonalresponsibility@gmail.com.

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Iraqi anti-government activists demand political change after unrest… https://juryteam.org/iraqi-anti-government-activists-demand-political-change-after-unrest/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 00:36:32 +0000 https://juryteam.org/iraqi-anti-government-activists-demand-political-change-after-unrest/ BAGHDAD — Hundreds of Iraqis angered by a months-long political crisis demonstrated in the capital Baghdad on Friday, days after deadly clashes between rival Shia groups raised fears of widespread unrest.اضافة اعلان Waving banners and Iraqi flags, nonpartisan protesters poured into Al-Nusor Square in western Baghdad, demanding a complete political overhaul, according to footage carried […]]]>

BAGHDAD — Hundreds of Iraqis angered by a months-long political crisis demonstrated in the capital Baghdad on Friday, days after deadly clashes between rival Shia groups raised fears of widespread unrest.اضافة اعلان

Waving banners and Iraqi flags, nonpartisan protesters poured into Al-Nusor Square in western Baghdad, demanding a complete political overhaul, according to footage carried by state media.

The mobilization follows nearly 11 months of paralysis which has left the country without a new government, prime minister or president, with Shia factions at odds over the formation of a coalition since elections last October.

The demonstrators chanted the slogan of the Arab Spring: “The people want the fall of the regime”.

Others carried banners and chanted slogans lamenting interference from neighboring Iran, according to videos and images circulating on social media.

“Iran will no longer govern,” they said.

The peaceful protesters were supporters of an anti-government protest movement that erupted in October 2019 but has since died down.

Their gatherings in Baghdad are not uncommon, but Friday’s relatively large turnout came after the political crisis in Iraq worsened.

Clashes between supporters of powerful Shiite cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr and rival Iran-backed factions earlier this week turned the Green Zone – home to government buildings and embassies – into a battleground.

Thirty Sadr supporters have been killed in nearly 24 hours of clashes that erupted on Monday after his supporters stormed the government headquarters.

The violence shifted to the south of the country on Thursday where overnight clashes between Sadr-affiliated fighters and Asaib Ahl Al-Haq’s rival Iranian-backed force left four militants dead.

Two members of Sadr’s Saraya Al-Salam force were among those killed.

The oil-rich country has been ravaged by decades of conflict and rampant corruption.

It is blighted by ailing infrastructure, power cuts and crumbling utilities, and now faces water shortages as drought ravages swaths of the country.

Despite Iraq’s oil wealth, many citizens are mired in poverty and some 35% of young people are unemployed, according to the UN.

Find out more Region and World
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Anti-government protesters in Iraq demand political change after unrest https://juryteam.org/anti-government-protesters-in-iraq-demand-political-change-after-unrest/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 17:09:00 +0000 https://juryteam.org/anti-government-protesters-in-iraq-demand-political-change-after-unrest/ Hundreds of Iraqis angered by a months-long political crisis demonstrated in the capital Baghdad on Friday, days after deadly clashes between rival Shiite groups raised fears of widespread unrest. Waving banners and Iraqi flags, nonpartisan protesters poured into al-Nusor Square in western Baghdad, demanding a complete political overhaul, according to footage carried by state media. […]]]>

Hundreds of Iraqis angered by a months-long political crisis demonstrated in the capital Baghdad on Friday, days after deadly clashes between rival Shiite groups raised fears of widespread unrest.

Waving banners and Iraqi flags, nonpartisan protesters poured into al-Nusor Square in western Baghdad, demanding a complete political overhaul, according to footage carried by state media.

For all the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or through the app.

The mobilization follows nearly 11 months of paralysis which has left the country without a new government, prime minister or president, as Shiite groups have disagreed over the formation of a coalition since elections last October.

Some demonstrators shouted the slogan: “The people want the fall of the regime”.

Others carried banners and chanted slogans lamenting interference from neighboring Iran, according to videos and images circulating on social media.

“Iran will no longer govern,” they said.

The peaceful protesters were supporters of an anti-government protest movement that erupted in October 2019 but has since died down.

Their gatherings in Baghdad are not uncommon, but Friday’s relatively large turnout came after the political crisis in Iraq worsened.

Clashes between supporters of Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and rival groups earlier this week turned the Green Zone – home to government buildings and embassies – into a battleground.

Thirty Sadr supporters have been killed in nearly 24 hours of clashes that erupted on Monday after his supporters stormed the government headquarters.

The violence shifted to the south of the country on Thursday where overnight clashes between Sadr-affiliated groups and the Iran-backed Asaib Ahl al-Haq force left four people dead.

Two members of Sadr’s Saraya al-Salam force were among those killed.

The oil-rich country has been ravaged by decades of conflict and rampant corruption.

It is blighted by ailing infrastructure, power cuts and crumbling utilities, and now faces water shortages as drought ravages swaths of the country.

Despite Iraq’s oil wealth, many citizens are mired in poverty and some 35% of young people are unemployed, according to the United Nations.

Read more:

Iraqi Qais al-Khazali decides to close militia offices across Iraq

Four dead as violent clashes move to Basra in Iraq

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A call for political change https://juryteam.org/a-call-for-political-change/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 17:12:43 +0000 https://juryteam.org/a-call-for-political-change/ This article first appeared in our morning newsletter, which is delivered Monday through Saturday to over 7,000 smart subscribers in the Charlotte area. You can become one of them. The Reverend William Barber, who started the ‘Moral Monday’ protest movement in Raleigh nearly a decade ago, announced plans for a 15-state campaign to reach more […]]]>

This article first appeared in our morning newsletter, which is delivered Monday through Saturday to over 7,000 smart subscribers in the Charlotte area. You can become one of them.

The Reverend William Barber, who started the ‘Moral Monday’ protest movement in Raleigh nearly a decade ago, announced plans for a 15-state campaign to reach more than 5 million poor and low-income voters before the midterm elections.

The campaign kicks off Tuesday, according to Repairers of the Breach, an organization founded and run by Barber.

At his church in Goldsboro on Sunday, Barber delivered what the organization called a “national sermon” that stressed the need for political unity among the poor and low-wage of all races.

“The health and well-being of this nation is at stake,” he said from the pulpit, “and if poor and low-income people don’t vote and determine who is in power and policy makers do not change course, we will face even more economic peril than we see now.

Barber said the problem was not with political parties but with political decisions, which he blamed for a host of social and economic ills.

“The only way to change policy,” he said, “is to put people in place who will change policy.”

In addition to the 15-state tour, which will be led by the Poor People’s Campaign, Barber’s organization also announced a campaign in North Carolina that will seek to mobilize voters in each of the state’s 14 congressional districts.

“Democracy is on the ballot because the right to vote is on the ballot; the need for a living wage is on the ballot; the need for health care and climate protection are on the ballot,” Barber said in a statement. “…Politics can only be changed when people are fully committed to democracy.”

Barber delivered the sermon exactly 67 to the day that 14-year-old Emmitt Till was murdered by white supremacists in Mississippi, and 59 to the day that 250,000 people gathered at the Lincoln Memorial on the march history on Washington in 1963.

Click here to listen to Barber’s sermon, which begins 1 hour and 18 minutes after the recording began.

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Greece needs political change after ‘Watergate’ scandal – EURACTIV.com https://juryteam.org/greece-needs-political-change-after-watergate-scandal-euractiv-com/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 03:32:23 +0000 https://juryteam.org/greece-needs-political-change-after-watergate-scandal-euractiv-com/ Political change is needed in Greece after it was discovered that the phone of socialist opposition leader Nikos Androulakis had been tapped by the national secret service, says Iratxe García, leader of the Socialists and Democrats in the European Parliament , at EURACTIV. The scandal, which hit the headlines at the end of July, sparked […]]]>

Political change is needed in Greece after it was discovered that the phone of socialist opposition leader Nikos Androulakis had been tapped by the national secret service, says Iratxe García, leader of the Socialists and Democrats in the European Parliament , at EURACTIV.

The scandal, which hit the headlines at the end of July, sparked strong reactions in Athens and tested the conservative government of Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

Since then, the head of Greece’s intelligence services and the head of Mitsotakis’ office have resigned, but the government maintains that the prime minister was unaware of the scandal. This denial was hard to believe for some, because the first law passed by the Prime Minister was the one that placed the secret services under his personal jurisdiction.

“According to the latest developments, it seems quite clear that Prime Minister Mitsotakis owes strong and clear explanations to Greek citizens and parties about his knowledge and responsibility in this scandal,” García said.

“This is also why our sister party in Greece has already called for the creation of a special commission of inquiry to determine any form of responsibility,” she added.

This week, an extraordinary meeting of the Greek Chamber is scheduled for the Conservative government to explain why the secret services tapped the socialist leader’s phone.

Further revelations are expected on August 24, when the new Secret Service chief hinted during a parliamentary session that other politicians or journalists could have their devices tapped by the Secret Service.

“I have had full control of the secret services for 15 days, a priori no one is exempt [from bugging]“, he said without further details.

For the Spanish politician, at EU level, a national intelligence service illegally tapping the phone of an opposition leader and MEP is “a violation of the rule of law and the principles of democracy enshrined in our Treaty”.

“There could also have been a breach of Mr. Androulakis’ parliamentary immunity, which is essential to guarantee the independence and integrity of the European Parliament as a whole. This is why I called on the President of the European Parliament to urgently ask the Greek authorities to undertake a thorough investigation and to disclose the reasons for the surveillance,” she said.

A difficult end for Mitsotakis?

In Athens, all progressive opposition parties condemned Mitsotakis for the scandal.

The main opposition, the left-wing Syriza party and the Pan-Hellenic Socialist Movement (Pasok) adopted a common line. Many suggest this could be a taste of a progressive government after the next general election.

The next elections are expected in a year; however, pressure is mounting on Mitsotakis to resign and call for a snap election.

Asked if this incident could bring Syriza and Pasok closer to a coalition government, García answered.

“It is not my role to engage in domestic politics or to anticipate scenarios after national elections. What is clear to the European progressive family is that Greece needs political change led by the Panhellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK)”.

EPP, Von der Leyen remain silent

The European Commission’s official position was reported by EURACTIV on 27 July, when a Commission spokesperson said: “Any attempt by national security services to illegally access the data of citizens, including journalists and political opponents, if confirmed, is unacceptable”.

But the European People’s Party, to which Mitsotakis’ New Democracy party is affiliated, and European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen – also an EPP member – have remained silent on the issue.

However, von der Leyen and EPP leader Manfred Weber issued statements during this period congratulating the government on the end of the EU surveillance mechanism for the Greek economy imposed several years ago as part of the rescue plans.

An EPP source, who spoke to EURACTIV on condition of anonymity, said Mitsotakis was “lucky” as the scandal came to light in mid-summer.

The same source added that New Democracy is considered the strongest EPP member currently in power in Europe, and therefore political support from the EPP leadership is to be expected.

“They won’t be firing on their last stronghold,” the source said, adding that the scandal could affect Mitsotakis’ personal ambitions to seek an “international role” in his political career after leaving the prime minister’s office.

[Edited by Alice Taylor]

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Here’s why oil-rich Angola is ripe for political change https://juryteam.org/heres-why-oil-rich-angola-is-ripe-for-political-change-2/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://juryteam.org/heres-why-oil-rich-angola-is-ripe-for-political-change-2/ Comment this story Comment Despite its oil wealth, Angola is a miserable place for many. The country produces 1.2 million barrels of crude a day, making it Africa’s second largest producer after Nigeria, but about half of its 33 million people live on less than $2 a day. Transplantation is widespread and most government services […]]]>

Comment

Despite its oil wealth, Angola is a miserable place for many. The country produces 1.2 million barrels of crude a day, making it Africa’s second largest producer after Nigeria, but about half of its 33 million people live on less than $2 a day. Transplantation is widespread and most government services are poor or non-existent. The blame lies with the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola, or MPLA, which ruled for nearly half a century and funneled much of the nation’s wealth into the hands of a small politically connected elite. . Opposition parties are capitalizing on dissatisfaction with the status quo and soaring food prices, and elections scheduled for August 24 are shaping up to be the most contested since the end of a 27-year civil war in 2002.

1. What is the record of the ruling party?

The MPLA has been credited with ending the war and presiding over an economic expansion that saw gross domestic product rise every year between 2003 and 2015 – when the end of an oil boom heralded the start of a five-year recession. Angola has also become synonymous with nepotism and corruption, with former President Jose Eduardo Dos Santos’ family and entourage among the main beneficiaries. President Joao Lourenço, 68, who succeeded Dos Santos in 2017 and is seeking a second term, has turned against his former allies and tried to recover billions of dollars they had hidden abroad. He also instituted a series of other reforms to consolidate Angola’s finances, diversify the economy and attract foreign investment. Although he has won international praise, his selective anti-corruption campaign and slow progress in tackling rampant poverty and unemployment have eroded his domestic support, especially among young people. Lourenço pleaded with his compatriots for patience, saying it is only a matter of time before his policies translate into better living conditions.

2. Who poses the greatest threat to the MPLA?

The ruling party’s main challenge comes from the National Union for the Total Liberation of Angola, or Unita, which was on the losing side of the civil war and has been its main political rival ever since. Unita is led by Adalberto Costa Junior, 60, who trained as an electronics engineer and was a lawmaker and party spokesman. Widely known as the ACJ, he pledged to redistribute Angola’s oil revenues and spoke out about unacceptable levels of corruption and poverty. His spirited and combative style of debate in parliament and in the media won him strong popularity among young urban voters. While Costa Junior has pledged to reduce the state’s role in the economy, he is ruled out replacing MPLA-appointed officials or waiving the nation’s debt obligations. He complained that the president has excessive powers and pledged to curb them if he wins the job.

3. Can the main opposition party win?

It’s unlikely. Lourenço and the MPLA have all the advantages of the mandate, including access to state resources to campaign. The party won 61% of the vote in the last national elections in 2017, and Unita only 27%. However, Unita’s fortunes appear to have turned since Costa Junior replaced Isaias Samakuva as leader of his party in 2019, and its election campaign has won the support of two smaller parties and Marcolino Moco, a former prime minister of the ruling party. An opinion poll released in May by the research firm Afrobarometer showed the MPLA leading Unita by just 7 percentage points. He also predicted that the opposition would get the most support in the capital, Luanda, which is home to most of the country’s voters. The government has since banned similar investigations. Campaign rallies organized by the two main parties drew large crowds across the country.

Foreign investors will be watching closely if the new administration proceeds with the planned sale of stakes in oil giant Sonangol EP and other state-owned companies. They will also monitor whether Angola is using windfall revenues from rising crude prices to help settle around $19 billion in debt owed to China – funding that has been used mostly to build roads, hospitals and rail links. The government has sought to diversify its funding away from the Asian nation. It completed a $4.5 billion program with the International Monetary Fund in 2021 and sold $1.75 billion in Eurobonds in 2022. It also aims to increase fuel sales to the European Union, which attempted to reduce its dependence on Russian oil and gas after the invasion. from Ukraine.

5. Will the election be credible?

As the National Electoral Commission insists the vote will be free and fair, officials from Unita and other opposition parties have questioned the independence of the body and accused it of favoring the MPLA and not doing enough to prevent electoral fraud. They also criticized the location of polling stations and complained that it is too difficult to register election observers. State media devoted 95% of election coverage to the government and ruling party, and broadcast its rallies live, according to Carlos Rosado de Carvalho, an economist at the Catholic University of Luanda, who has followed the campaigns. UNITA has asked its supporters to maintain a presence around the polling stations to ensure that the voting and counting are fair. The party has ruled out a return to armed conflict but threatened to organize street demonstrations in the event of an attempt to rig the elections. Several observation missions will monitor the vote, including those of the EU and the African Union.

6. How is the election going?

Eight parties will contest 220 seats in the single-chamber parliament. The person who heads the list of legislative candidates of the party that wins the most seats in the National Assembly becomes president. More than 14 million people have registered to vote.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com

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