Political party

State vaccination rate down by political party

Analysis of states with the highest and lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates to date shows a clear partisan divide.


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  • Analysis of states with the highest and lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates to date shows a clear partisan divide
  • The 20 states with the highest rates of residents who received at least one dose of the vaccine all went to Joe Biden in last year’s presidential election
  • Nineteen of the 21 states with the lowest vaccination rates supported Donald Trump
  • Vermont has at least partially vaccinated the highest percentage of its residents, at 61.9%, while Mississippi has the lowest vaccination rate at 32%

The 20 states with the highest rates of residents who received at least one dose of vaccine all went to Joe Biden in last year’s presidential election, while 19 of the 21 states with the highest immunization rates. down supported Donald Trump.

Republicans’ reluctance to vaccines – many with legitimate questions, others influenced by misinformation – has been a hot topic in cable news and social media for months, but the data backs up those concerns.

As of Monday, Vermont had at least partially vaccinated the highest percentage of its residents, at 61.9%, followed by Maine (60.6%) and Hawaii (58.8%), according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All six of New England’s states ranked in the top seven nationally.

The three states with the lowest vaccination rates were all in the Deep South – Mississippi (32%), Louisiana (33.5%) and Alabama (33.8%).

The national average is 46%.

The percentage of people who received at least one dose of the vaccine in each state on Monday, according to the CDC

The numbers are not surprising. A Monmouth University poll in March found 36% of Republicans said they had no intention of getting the vaccine, compared to 6% of Democrats. An NPR-PBS Newshour-Marist survey around the same time found that 49% of Republican men said they would not get vaccinated, compared to 6% of Democratic men.

A study published last month by researchers at the Rady School of Management at the University of California at San Diego found Republicans increasingly skeptical of a potential COVID-19 vaccine – as well as other vaccines, including the flu shot. Republicans have also always viewed the coronavirus as less of a threat than Democrats, according to the study. The researchers said that one potential reason for the disparities is that Republicans and Democrats said they consumed information from different sources.

“We now know that political affiliation is an important indicator of how communities respond to public health issues,” the study authors wrote. “If we understand the areas and communities where reluctance to immunize may increase, it can help inform effective health communication and interventions. “

However, while the vaccination rate in the United States has steadily declined over the past month, vaccine reluctance among the general public and Republicans appears to be decreasing. Thirty-two percent of Republicans in an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released Tuesday said they likely or definitely would not get vaccinated, up from 44% in January.

President Joe Biden has set a goal that 70% of American adults will receive at least one dose of the vaccine by July 4. Currently that number is 58.5%.

Five states – Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont – have already passed the 70% threshold, while Maine was on the cusp of Wednesday. Fifteen other states have already administered at least one dose to 60-70% of its adults.

Biden held a bipartisan virtual meeting with governors on Tuesday to discuss ways to increase vaccination rates.

The Biden administration, meanwhile, announced a series of new initiatives to try to meet the 70% target, including a partnership with Uber and Lyft to provide free rides and train vaccination sites, and to so retail pharmacies and community colleges are teaming up to vaccinate students. , staff and residents.

The White House has also changed the way vaccine doses are allocated by redistributing more to states where demand is greatest.

Federal officials have also tried to appeal to people who vaccine-hesitant, including Republicans, might be more likely to trust, including religious and community leaders, doctors and celebrities.

“There is a lot of information circulating,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said on Tuesday. “And that’s not all that malicious misinformation is, and we don’t always see it that way. However, we are focused on… empowering and engaging local voices… ensuring that accurate information does not only arrive through paid or even acquired media channels, but also through local and trusted voices. And this is what we have seen to be the most effective in breaking through. “


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